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PC Control These demos and projects allow the robot to be controlled via a computer.

ArbotiX Commander Control - These demos and projects control the Robot using the ArbotiX Commander, the handheld Arduino based remote control.

Direct Control - These demos and projects control the Robot directly from sensors connected directly to the Robot's control board.

Pose Control - These demos and projects allow you to create and playback a sequence of poses.

Serial Control - These demos and projects control the robot using a serial packet protocol.

Standalone - These demos and projects are deisgned to let your robot function without a computer or additional microcontroller.

Wireless Control - These demos and projects allow you to control the robot wirelessly - usually by replacing the Serial Connection with XBee modules.

Reference - These articles have technical details regarding the control and operation of the robot.

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More info here

Snapper Arm Projects

  • Snapper Arm Mixologist

    Garage Door Opener
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    Standalone
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    PC Control (Setup Only)

    This project mixes the perfect beverage with style and class. This one is a bit more advanced than the Snapper Arm Bartender. Welcome to the Robot Arm Mixologist. This project utilizes a RobotGeek Snapper Arm with a Pumping Station to mix liquids from multiple containers.

    We will be using a Demo code to show off how to make alterations to the code generated by the Arm Link Software. We will use this to program the arm's movements.

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  • Snapper Arm Bartender

    Garage Door Opener
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    Standalone
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    PC Control (Setup Only)

    Ever wish you had a robot that could doll out the shots? The future of partying is here with the Robot Arm Bartender! Serve up drinks in style, and impress your guests with the press of a button! This project utilizes a RobotGeek Snapper Arm with a Pumping Station to move some delicious liquids from container to glass! We will be using the Arm Link Software to program the arm's movements.

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  • Snapper Arm Wii Classic Controller Demo

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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo shows how to control the Snapper robot arm using a Wii Classic Controller in three separate modes, Backhoe (direct servo control), Cartesian (x/y/z coordinates), or Cylindrical.

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  • Arm Link Software For RobotGeek Snapper

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    PC Control

    The InterbotiX Arm Link Software provides a simple control interface for the RobotGeek Snapper Robot Arm.

    In addition to directly controlling your Robot Arm, the Arm Link software can also activate digital outputs, read analog inputs, play motion sequences, and display webcam feeds.

    This software is offered as a simple control solution for these Robot Arms as well as an example for individuals who wish to integrate the Robot Arms into their own applications and systems. InterbotiX Arm Link is an open source program written in Java in the Processing environment. To learn more about building and customizing the software click here.

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  • Arm Link Sequence Playback

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    PC Control

    This article will show you how to use the Arm Link Software and Firmware to capture, change and arrange a sequence of poses. You can then save that sequence to a new stand-alone firmware. This sequence can be integrated into your own custom projects.

    Before you start this project, make sure you've assembled, programed, and tested your robotic arm by going through the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide. You will also need to go through the Arm Link Software getting started guide to learn how to install and use the Arm Link Software.

    For more information on Arm Link and Arm Link References, please see the Arm Link Overview Page

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  • Snapper Arm Sequence Playback

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    Pose Control
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    Standalone

    This article will show you how to use the poses you recorded in earlier demos to change and arrange a sequence of poses. You can then save that sequence to a new stand-alone firmware. This sequence can be integrated into your own custom projects.

    Before you start this project, make sure you've assembled, programed, and tested your robotic arm by going through the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide as well as having gone through one of the joystick control demos - 1.Backhoe, Cartesian IK or 3. Cylindrical IK

    Read More
  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Backhoe Demo - OLD for Reference Only

    This firmware is not longer recommended or supported - all backhoe and playback function have been wrapped into the General RobotGeek Snapper Control Firmware. This page is for reference only.

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo shows how to control the Snapper robot arm using joysticks for input in backhoe mode. Backhoe means that the servos are being controlled individually and there are no inverse kinematics being used. This is the most basic way of controlling a robotic arm and is good for learning basic input and output on an Arduino. The following tutorials after this one show more advanced arm control.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper - Basic Servo Interpolation

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    Pose Control

    This demo shows how to control the Snapper robot arm from code using basic servo interpolation. Servos can be moved one at a time or in batches. Interpolation is used to move the servos incrementally over time and produce smooth arm movement.

    If you have not already, make sure you have gone through the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide this will help make sure you've downloaded the RobotGeek Tools and Libraries, the demo firmware and have setup and tested the arm.

    Read More
  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Inverse Kinematics Demo - OLD for Reference Only

    This firmware is not longer recommended or supported - all backhoe and playback function have been wrapped into the General RobotGeek Snapper Control Firmware. This page is for reference only.

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    In the last demo you learned how to control each individual servo on the Snapper Arm. In this demo you will harness the power of Inverse Kinematics to move the servos in tandem to reach a specific point in space.

    For example, let's say you want to move the gripper on the Snapper Arm directly down along the Z-Axis. To do this you would need to move the shoulder, elbow and wrist servos to specific positions until the gripper moved directly down relative to it's original position. Inverse Kinematics (or IK) uses a series of kinematic equations to determine the position for each joint so that the gripper (generally called the 'end effector') will move to a specific position in X/Y/Z space. Using IK, you an issue a single X/Y/Z position you would like the arm to move to, instead of manually moving each joint on the arm.

    The SnapperArmIK firmware contains a fully functional IK engine. You do not need to be able to write or understand the kinematic equations in order to use the firmware (though it is a great place to start when you want to learn about the inner workings of kinematics)

    You can use the SnapperArmIK firmware to set the X/Y/Z position of the arm using the joystick control panel, and playback pre-programmed X/Y/Z.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper Serial Mode Demo

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    PC Control
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    Serial Control

    The Arm Control library, firmware, and software will allow you to control InterbotiX arms by sending an absolute coordinate in X/Y/Z space for the arm to move to. This setup is useful for integrating the arm with software applications and other robotic systems.

    This firmware is offered for advanced users with knowledge of serial-level communications.

    When the SnapperArmSerial sketch is loaded onto the snapper arm, the arm will respond to a specially formulated serial packet. This packet will contain the absolute goal position of the end-effector (the gripper) in XYZ space, the angle of the wrist servo, the position of the gripper, and the speed of the arm.

    This firmware also suports Cylindrical IK and Backhoe/ Joint control mode.

    If you have not already, make sure you have gone through the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide this will help make sure you've downloaded the RobotGeek Tools and Libraries, the demo firmware and have setup and tested the arm.

    Read More
  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Backhoe Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo shows how to control the Snapper robot arm using joysticks for input in backhoe mode. Backhoe means that each of the servos are being controlled by an individual analog input - one joystick axis for the base, one joystick axis for the shoulder, etc. There are no inverse kinematics being used - inverse kinematics are discussed in another demo.

    This demonstration used the same firmware as some of the other more complex control methods - the control mode is changed in a simple line of code that we will show you.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Cartesian XYZ Inverse Kinematics Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    In the last demo you learned how to control each individual servo on the Snapper Arm. In this demo you will harness the power of Inverse Kinematics to move the servos in tandem to reach a specific point in space.

    For example, let's say you want to move the gripper on the Snapper Arm directly down along the Z-Axis. To do this you would need to move the shoulder, elbow and wrist servos to specific positions until the gripper moved directly down relative to it's original position - a tedious process. Inverse Kinematics (or IK) uses a series of kinematic equations to determine the position for each joint so that the gripper (or 'end effector') will move to a specific position in X/Y/Z space. Using IK, you an issue a single X/Y/Z position you would like the arm to move to, instead of manually moving each joint on the arm.

    The SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware contains a fully functional IK engine. You do not need to be able to write or understand the kinematic equations in order to use the firmware (though it is a great place to start when you want to learn about the inner workings of kinematics)

    You can use the SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware to set the X/Y/Z position of the arm using the joystick control panel, and to read the current IK position to load into a playback firmware.

    Read More
  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Cylindrical YZ Inverse Kinematics Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo is a slight variant to the Caresian IK Demo and we reccomend you try theat demo first for a full explanation of what Inverse Kinematics is. In this demo you the IK engine will only work on the y and z axis - the base servo will be manually controlled via joystick. This gives you a larger work area than with Cartesian.

    The SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware contains a fully functional IK engine. You do not need to be able to write or understand the kinematic equations in order to use the firmware (though it is a great place to start when you want to learn about the inner workings of kinematics)

    You can use the SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware to set the Base/Y/Z position of the arm using the joystick control panel, and to read the current IK position to load into a playback firmware.

    Read More
  • RobotGeek Snapper Arduino Uno Wiring Guide - No Shield

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    Reference

    The RobotGeek Sensor Shield makes it easy to hook up your RobotGeek servos to your Arduino microcontroller. However, if you don't have a shield, you can still use a breadboard and wires to hook your Arduino up to the Robotgeek Snapper Arm.

    If you are looking for information on wiring the Snapper Arm using a Sensor Shield, see the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide.

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