×

PC Control These demos and projects allow the robot to be controlled via a computer.

ArbotiX Commander Control - These demos and projects control the Robot using the ArbotiX Commander, the handheld Arduino based remote control.

Direct Control - These demos and projects control the Robot directly from sensors connected directly to the Robot's control board.

Pose Control - These demos and projects allow you to create and playback a sequence of poses.

Serial Control - These demos and projects control the robot using a serial packet protocol.

Standalone - These demos and projects are deisgned to let your robot function without a computer or additional microcontroller.

Wireless Control - These demos and projects allow you to control the robot wirelessly - usually by replacing the Serial Connection with XBee modules.

Reference - These articles have technical details regarding the control and operation of the robot.

×

More info here

RobotGeek 101: 9G Servo Control

This lesson is part of the RobotGeek 101 Learning Series. If you haven't already, please download the example sketches, and follow through the Geekduino Getting Started Guide to handle the foundations of using the Arduino IDE in conjunction with the Geekduino.

Welcome to RobotGeek 101 : Servo Control. This lesson will show you how to control 180 ° and continuous turn servo. The following videos for this lesson will walk you through everything you need to do to get started with RobotGeek Servos.

Parts used in this lesson:

These parts and everything you need to complete chapters 1-7 in RobotGeek 101 are available in the RobotGeek Basic Experimenter's Kit.

Contents:

Introduction

A Servo is a motor combined with a position sensing device, such as a potentiometer or an encoder. FS90 Micro Servos are a low cost way to get involved with learning about servo control in the Arduino environment. Servo Horns allow you to attach things and mount your servo to a wide variety of plates, sensors, gears, linkages, and even other servos. Servos utilize the Servo Arduino library. Libraries give you access to functions and abilities that you otherwise would not have as a stock function.

Servos typically move anywhere between 0 and 180 degrees. There are a couple ways to do this using the servo library, so let's get started by watching the video and following the instruction below.

Back to Contents

A-servoDegrees

video.png Click here to expand the video

code.png Click here to expand the code

diagram.png Click here to expand the diagram

Let's use the Arduino IDE to set the positions on a servo using servo.write(). Open the following sketch in your Arduino IDE

File > Sketchbook > RobotGeek sketches > RG101 > 05 - servo > A-servoDegrees

Back to Contents

B-servoMicroseconds

video.png Click here to expand the video

code.png Click here to expand the code

diagram.png Click here to expand the diagram

Let's use the Arduino IDE to set the positions on a servo using servo.writeMicroseconds(). Open the following sketch in your Arduino IDE

File > Sketchbook > RobotGeek sketches > RG101 > 05 - servo > B-servoMicroseconds

Back to Contents

C-analogInServoOut

video.png Click here to expand the video

code.png Click here to expand the code

diagram.png Click here to expand the diagram

Let's use the Arduino IDE to set the positions on a servo using servo.writeMicroseconds() based on the input from an analog sensor. Open the following sketch in your Arduino IDE

File > Sketchbook > RobotGeek sketches > RG101 > 05 - servo > C-analogInServoOut

Back to Contents

E-detachServo

video.png Click here to expand the video

code.png Click here to expand the code

diagram.png Click here to expand the diagram

Let's use the Arduino IDE to set the positions on a servo using servo.writeMicroseconds(). Pressing a button will detach the servo using servo.detach(), stopping it from receiving commands. Open the following sketch in your Arduino IDE

File > Sketchbook > RobotGeek sketches > RG101 > 05 - servo > E-detachServo

Back to Contents

F-analogInServoOutSerial

video.png Click here to expand the video

code.png Click here to expand the code

diagram.png Click here to expand the diagram

Let's use the Arduino IDE to set the positions on a servo using servo.write(). Open the following sketch in your Arduino IDE

File > Sketchbook > RobotGeek sketches > RG101 > 05 - servo > F-analogInServoOutSerial

Back to Contents

Servo Control Reference

If you are interested in learning more about Servo Control, check out our Servo Control Reference Lesson. In this lesson we will look at the remaining RG101 examples and provide you with links to advanced Servo Control topics.

Back to Contents

Feedback Form


Search