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PC Control These demos and projects allow the robot to be controlled via a computer.

ArbotiX Commander Control - These demos and projects control the Robot using the ArbotiX Commander, the handheld Arduino based remote control.

Direct Control - These demos and projects control the Robot directly from sensors connected directly to the Robot's control board.

Pose Control - These demos and projects allow you to create and playback a sequence of poses.

Serial Control - These demos and projects control the robot using a serial packet protocol.

Standalone - These demos and projects are deisgned to let your robot function without a computer or additional microcontroller.

Wireless Control - These demos and projects allow you to control the robot wirelessly - usually by replacing the Serial Connection with XBee modules.

Reference - These articles have technical details regarding the control and operation of the robot.

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More info here

RFIDuino Demos

  • Arduino Linear Actuator Tutorial - Manual Button Control

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    Direct Control

    This Arduino Linear Actuator Tutorial shows how to do basic manual control of a large linear actuator using an Arduino and two buttons. The first button extends the actuator and the second retracts the actuator.

    Large linear actuators traditionally have five wires. Two wires are for powering the motor and three wires go the internal potentiometer for reading position. The two relays are used to toggle the positive and negative power to the motor in order to determine the direction of piston travel. The analog potentiometer is wired to one of the analog inputs on the sensor shield for reading the current position. For this project we do have the analog wired up, but we are not using the analog input in the body of the code since we are just doing simple control of driving the piston in or out.

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  • Arduino Linear Actuator Tutorial - Preset Position Button Control

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    Standalone
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    Pose Control

    This Arduino Linear Actuator Tutorial shows how to do basic control of a large linear actuator using an Arduino and two buttons with each button preset to a position.

    Large linear actuators traditionally have five wires. Two wires are for powering the motor and three wires go the internal potentiometer for reading position. The two relays are used to toggle the positive and negative power to the motor in order to determine the direction of piston travel. The analog potentiometer is wired to one of the analog inputs on the sensor shield for reading the current position. When a button is pressed the code reads the current position, then determines which direction to drive the piston to reach the goal position. Once the goal position is reached it shuts off the power to the motor.

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  • Arduino Solenoid Tutorial - Buttons Demo

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    Direct Control

    This Arduino Solenoid Tutorial shows how to control a solenoid using pushbuttons and a relay with your Arduino compatible controller. Solenoids are electromagnetically driven actuators. When voltage is applied to the solenoid coil the electromagnetic force pulls the center plunger in. It is an excellent mechanical solution for all kinds of DIY projects requiring short quick linear actuation. Solenoids are most often found in latching and trigger-like mechanisms, such as door locking systems, paintball guns, pinball machines, dot matrix printers, and fuel injectors. Let's get started.



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  • RobotGeek Snapper Serial Mode Demo

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    PC Control
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    Serial Control

    The Arm Control library, firmware, and software will allow you to control InterbotiX arms by sending an absolute coordinate in X/Y/Z space for the arm to move to. This setup is useful for integrating the arm with software applications and other robotic systems.

    This firmware is offered for advanced users with knowledge of serial-level communications.

    When the SnapperArmSerial sketch is loaded onto the snapper arm, the arm will respond to a specially formulated serial packet. This packet will contain the absolute goal position of the end-effector (the gripper) in XYZ space, the angle of the wrist servo, the position of the gripper, and the speed of the arm.

    This firmware also suports Cylindrical IK and Backhoe/ Joint control mode.

    If you have not already, make sure you have gone through the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide this will help make sure you've downloaded the RobotGeek Tools and Libraries, the demo firmware and have setup and tested the arm.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Backhoe Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo shows how to control the Snapper robot arm using joysticks for input in backhoe mode. Backhoe means that each of the servos are being controlled by an individual analog input - one joystick axis for the base, one joystick axis for the shoulder, etc. There are no inverse kinematics being used - inverse kinematics are discussed in another demo.

    This demonstration used the same firmware as some of the other more complex control methods - the control mode is changed in a simple line of code that we will show you.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Cartesian XYZ Inverse Kinematics Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    In the last demo you learned how to control each individual servo on the Snapper Arm. In this demo you will harness the power of Inverse Kinematics to move the servos in tandem to reach a specific point in space.

    For example, let's say you want to move the gripper on the Snapper Arm directly down along the Z-Axis. To do this you would need to move the shoulder, elbow and wrist servos to specific positions until the gripper moved directly down relative to it's original position - a tedious process. Inverse Kinematics (or IK) uses a series of kinematic equations to determine the position for each joint so that the gripper (or 'end effector') will move to a specific position in X/Y/Z space. Using IK, you an issue a single X/Y/Z position you would like the arm to move to, instead of manually moving each joint on the arm.

    The SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware contains a fully functional IK engine. You do not need to be able to write or understand the kinematic equations in order to use the firmware (though it is a great place to start when you want to learn about the inner workings of kinematics)

    You can use the SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware to set the X/Y/Z position of the arm using the joystick control panel, and to read the current IK position to load into a playback firmware.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper - Joystick Cylindrical YZ Inverse Kinematics Demo

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    PC Control (Setup Only)
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    Direct Control
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    Pose Control

    This demo is a slight variant to the Caresian IK Demo and we reccomend you try theat demo first for a full explanation of what Inverse Kinematics is. In this demo you the IK engine will only work on the y and z axis - the base servo will be manually controlled via joystick. This gives you a larger work area than with Cartesian.

    The SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware contains a fully functional IK engine. You do not need to be able to write or understand the kinematic equations in order to use the firmware (though it is a great place to start when you want to learn about the inner workings of kinematics)

    You can use the SnapperArmJoystickControl firmware to set the Base/Y/Z position of the arm using the joystick control panel, and to read the current IK position to load into a playback firmware.

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  • Desktop RoboTurret - Direct Control - Joystick

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    Direct Control

    This demonstration shows how to control the Desktop RoboTurret using direct control via a joystick and a pushbutton.

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  • Desktop RoboTurret - I2C Control - Wii Nunchuk

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    Direct Control

    This demonstration shows how to control the Desktop RoboTurret using direct control via I2C with a Wii Nunchuck Controller.

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  • Desktop RoboTurret - PC Control - Vision Tracking Via RoboRealm

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    PC Control

    This demonstration shows how to control the Desktop RoboTurret via PC using data from a webcam using the RoboRealm software.

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  • Desktop RoboTurret - Face & Object Tracking Via RoboRealm

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    PC Control

    This demonstration shows how to control the Desktop RoboTurret to track faces and objects via PC using data from a webcam using the RoboRealm software.

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  • RobotGeek Snapper Arduino Uno Wiring Guide - No Shield

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    Reference

    The RobotGeek Sensor Shield makes it easy to hook up your RobotGeek servos to your Arduino microcontroller. However, if you don't have a shield, you can still use a breadboard and wires to hook your Arduino up to the Robotgeek Snapper Arm.

    If you are looking for information on wiring the Snapper Arm using a Sensor Shield, see the Snapper Arm Getting Started Guide.

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